There is significant evidence that the land was shared by both populations, yes. But colonization by European settlers who were for centuries removed from the land, with the intention of removing the Palestinian population, is very different than trying to once again live as neighbours within the same territory. I think the Palestinian government has plenty of problems, but it’s unreasonable to expect a population to agree to a “peace process” that further hinders their rights. There is an undeniable power imbalance that has rendered discussions of peace unfair. For example, negotiations between Abbas and Netanyahu in 2010 ended prematurely because the Israeli Prime Minister refused to halt the expansion of illegal settlements while discussions were underway, muddled further by US diplomatic influence. But there are countless examples. Can you really expect the Palestinians to agree to “peace” under circumstances where Israel continues to forgo standards for human rights and legal obligations under international law? To “peace” that continues to treat them unfairly?

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Striving to live a life defined by empathy | writing about climate change, public health and social justice

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Amanda Hanemaayer

Amanda Hanemaayer

Striving to live a life defined by empathy | writing about climate change, public health and social justice

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